February 23, 2017

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How I make memorable passwords

How I make memorable passwords

I hear a lot of people complaining about having to make up and remember passwords all the time. I came up with what I think is a foolproof technique. Instead of just explaining it to my friends and family as I lecture them about using a password manager and how much easier they their lives would be if they just listened to me… I wrote my method down in 5 easy steps.

Forgot your passwowrd?

Step 1:

Think of one of your favorite songs. I’m talking one that you can sing in your sleep. One that you never have to think “what’s the first line again?”. I’m a big rap fan so I’m going to choose Forgot About Dre by Dr Dre ft Eminem and Hittman. You choose one now too.

Step 2:

Choose a line or phrase from the song that has at least 8 words in it that you will always be able to remember. For example:

Ya’ll know me still the same ol’ G but I been low key

Step 3:

Take the first letter of each of the words in the phrase:

ykmstsogbiblk

Step 4:

This step has a few options depending on how your brain works. Option one is to just use the entire phrase as is without spaces and without changing any of the characters. I tend to still capitalise the sentences as so:

YallknowmeStillsameolGButIbeenlowkey

This still works great because you have so many characters the lack of character types doesn’t really matter mathematically

Password Strength

The second option is replace some of the letters with capitals, numbers or symbols where it seems most logical. For example using the Forgot About Dre lyrics I could upper case the “i” (I been low key) and the “g” (same ol’ G) since it is upper cased in the original sentence. Or for example I could decide that I would capitalise based on the sentences so it would be

YnmStsogBiblk.

There are endless options but make sure your capitalisation or use of special characters is not completely arbitrary or you might forget how you did it even if you still remember the lyric.

Step 5:

Write the password down in a notebook or something (and don’t write “passwords here” on the notebook…), put it somewhere safe in your house. This might seem strange since I’m advocating for using a password manager, but I still write down my main passwords just in case because nothing beats good ol’ analog paper for posterity.

Rejoice! Now you have a method to create passwords that are both random and hard to guess and easy to remember! And you can have fun playing your password in time with the

Further Reading

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Seth Reid

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How I make memorable passwords